O’Reilly and CMP Announce the 2.0 of Web 2.0 Conferences

It’s true, throughout the rise of everything “two point oh,” O’Reilly is not only leading a movement, but is also learning many things along the way, such as, there’s money to be made from new Web duex companies, when they themselves have yet to figure out how to generate significant revenue, and, that sometimes bad publicity can have major “net” results…sorry, had to fit in the pun.

Just a bit of quick background for you…The invite-only Web 2.0 Conference launched in 2004 and gave name to the resurgence of the internet economy as well as helping to frame the new ideas shaping the rebirth. The next Web 2.0 conference will be held in November 7-9 at the Palace Hotel in San Francisco. But, as mentioned before, it’s invite only…attendees, speakers, press, and exhibitors – I’m not sure about sponsors however. If you got a dime…I’m sure they got the time.

However, there’s been a small amount of rumblings about the elite nature of the event, especially since “social” media and networking is helping to drive much of the “resurgence.” But hey, if you can’t attend this event, start your own Web 2.0 event right? Well, not necessarily. As we all know, CMP’s lawyers were quick to protect their baby. However, change is on the horizon.

First, O’Reilly and company are humanizing their efforts. In addition to the technical conference, the group is expanding its roster with a new, well, tradeshow.

It was spawned to meet the “increasing” demand for Web 2.0 visibility, vision, and to expand the Web 2.0 community. The first Web 2.0 Expo is set for April 15-18, 2007 at Moscone in San Francisco.

Per the site: Web 2.0 Expo is an annual gathering of the technical, design, marketing, and business professionals who are building the next generation web. Web 2.0 Expo will feature some of the most innovative and successful Internet industry figures and companies providing attendees with examples of business models, development paradigms, and design strategies to enable mainstream businesses and new arrivals to the Web 2.0 world to take advantage of this new generation of services and opportunities.

O’Reilly commented on Radar , “We saw the need for a second event that focuses on how to actually build effective Web 2.0 applications. We’re tackling not just Web 2.0 as strategy but also design, programming, operations, and viral marketing — the elements of execution that will ultimately separate the winners from the me-too companies in the space.”

Sounds interesting, and, word on the street is that there are already many companies that have already inquired on how to participate on all fronts. Hopefully it will stay focused, unlike the InternetWorld expos from the last bubble.

But wait, there’s more.

O’Reilly has since eluded to mishandling the cease-and-desist debacle that fueled the buzz all over the blogosphere. He also announced on radar, “In conjunction with the announcement of the new Web 2.0 Expo , I’m also pleased to report that CMP has agreed to narrow the scope of enforcement of the Web 2.0 trademark registration. It will only seek to protect the Web 2.0 trademark if another other Web 2.0-related event has a name that is confusingly similar to the names of the actual events co-produced by CMP and O’Reilly.”

Good move…in order to gain greater support and credibility, they need to open the doors.

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Tags: web 2.0 , oreilly , cmp , internetworld , bubble , web2.0 , radar

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ABOUT ME

Brian Solis is a digital analyst, anthropologist, and also a futurist. In his work at Altimeter Group, Solis studies the effects of disruptive technology on business and society. He is an avid keynote speaker and award-winning author who is globally recognized as one of the most prominent thought leaders in digital transformation.

His most recent book, What's the Future of Business: Changing the Way Businesses Create Experiences (WTF), explores the landscape of connected consumerism and how business and customer relationships unfold in four distinct moments of truth. His previous book, The End of Business as Usual, explores the emergence of Generation-C, a new generation of customers and employees and how businesses must adapt to reach them. In 2009, Solis released Engage, which is regarded as the industry reference guide for businesses to market, sell and service in the social web.

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