In the Social Web, We Are All Brand Managers


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Effectively organizing, curating, showcasing, and managing a strategically curated online personal, professional, and corporate brand is critical to how our peers, those we already know and the others we have yet to meet, perceive us in the real world.

Everything we share online, the comments we leave, the posts we publish, the pictures and videos we upload, the updates we tweet, the statuses we broadcast in social networks and lifestreams, contribute to disparate digital recreations of how people perceive us – as an individual, representative of a company, or the corporate brand we manage. While we can’t control the filters of how people ultimately assemble these pieces and assess our personality, reputation, value proposition, and expertise, we can shape and steer perception by sharing tactical and complimentary content that contributes to the brand we wish to portray and represent.

We are all, at some level, becoming brand managers.

The Social Web is a vast universe.

But don’t let its expansiveness deter your goals for creating and cultivating a strategic presence. Whether you’re new to Social Media or an experienced veteran, we are collectively tied to the evolution of the social Web simply by who we know or want to know. To stay connected with friends, family, customers, and professional peers, we join the digital communities that facilitate meaningful and relevant conversations. Evolution is natural and our existing and future relationships will dictate in which communities we remain and those we will eventually embrace.

But how do you know where to establish your online presence and secure your associated brand before it’s either spoken for or hijacked?

A good place to start is by analyzing the Conversation Prism. It provides a visual map that will guide you through the process of identifying communities and conversations related to the brand you represent.

In the era of the socialized Web, brand and reputation management is now integrated as systematic process in our daily routine. We ARE responsible for our personal brand as well as the corporate brand we represent. Securing that online brand and investing in and cultivating an impeccable and influential reputation is critical to establishing and maintaining a consistent, strategic, and complementary presence from network to network.

There is a helpful dashboard now available for brand managers to streamline the process of obtaining and creating online identities.

CheckUserNames cross references every major social network for the availability of your desired username. The results are displayed in one master dashboard, providing you with the ability to determine which networks require your attention and also a direct link to secure the username.

Whether you’re a corporate brand manager or focusing on your personal brand, securing your identity and increasing your visibility in the online communities that are important to your world is constant. Care for these brands and manage their respective reputations well and they will pay dividends in the form of more fruitful, valuable, rewarding , and in some cases, monetizable, relationships online and in the real world.

For a deeper look at the Social Web and its impact on your online persona, please read:

The Socialization of Your Personal Brand- Part I
The Socialization of Your Personal Brand- Part II
The Socialization of Your Personal Brand- Part III

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  • smp

    No. On the Social Web, we are all REPUTATION managers.

    Your “Personal” Brand is something you can create and is closed to influence from the outside. Your reputation is how people see you, regardless of your brand.

    Ignore your reputation and your brand is worthless.

  • MyRecordPurse

    I like that,,Hadn’t thought about brand managers,, so true,,I did know we are all our own service corporations….Cool

  • Britton Manasco

    Oh my…the more I read your revelations on reputations, the more I have to wonder what we’ll be able to comfortably say in a social media matrix that never forgets a thing. After all, social media encourages us to play and speak our minds. But it it also threatens to punish us forever for an ill-considered slip of the tongue. My suggestion: Don’t drink and Twitter!

    Britton Manasco
    Illuminating the Future

  • Allan

    @smp – Brand is actually not something you can control. Enlightened brand managers know that your brand is what people say you are. In essence, brand = reputation. You have some initial say on what your brand is and you can contribute to what your brand means, but in the long run, it belongs to the people.

  • Shannon Bain

    Good post. All of this ties into the more general notion of display or self-presentation that has been part of social psychological theorizing for a while. If you’re interested, here’s a more theoretical take on the issues of self-presentation through social media/functionality:

    http://directreference.blogspot.com/2008/10/defining-situation-goffman-social.html

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ABOUT ME

Brian Solis is a digital analyst, anthropologist, and also a futurist. In his work at Altimeter Group, Solis studies the effects of disruptive technology on business and society. He is an avid keynote speaker and award-winning author who is globally recognized as one of the most prominent thought leaders in digital transformation.

His most recent book, What's the Future of Business: Changing the Way Businesses Create Experiences (WTF), explores the landscape of connected consumerism and how business and customer relationships unfold in four distinct moments of truth. His previous book, The End of Business as Usual, explores the emergence of Generation-C, a new generation of customers and employees and how businesses must adapt to reach them. In 2009, Solis released Engage, which is regarded as the industry reference guide for businesses to market, sell and service in the social web.

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