The Greatest Hits of 2009 Part VIII


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Happy New Year!

Welcome to 2010…this is your year. Let’s build upon the lessons we learned in 2009 in order to help us continue on our journey towards earned relevance.

The Greatest Hits of 2009 Part VIII

1. The Second Life of Second Life

2. The Science of Retweets on Twitter

3. Teens Adopting Twitter

4. Social Media Accounts for 18% of Information Search Market

5. The Future of the Social Web

Facebook Top Trends of 2009

Contrary to popular belief, Twitter wasn’t the only story of 2009. Facebook skyrocketed to over 350 millions users in 2009 and continued its rise to global pervasiveness becoming one of the top visited sites on the Web.

As aspiring digital anthropologists and sociologists, we thoroughly enjoy and appreciate the trending topics readily available for review and analysis on Twitter. On Twitter, trends are defined and shaped by the shared interests published in the form of status updates that suddenly congregate and rally.

Ideas Connect Us More than Relationships

Earlier in the year, I was invited to share my thoughts and observations on the state of and vision for socialized media and the networks that connect us. Shot in a mobile studio outside of the Austin Convention Center during SXSW09, I joined Gary Bolles to discuss the theory that ideas are the “ties that bind” us in social networking – over relationships.

The Greatest Hits of 2009 Part VII


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As 2009 comes to a close, we’re inspired to take what we learned this year and apply it to the uncharted year that lies ahead. Our resolutions for 2010 must include learning and participation. With an open mind and an open heart, we can continue to learn, grow, and in turn, teach those around us to make 2010 a banner year for new media literacy and change.

The Greatest Hits of 2009 Part VII

The Greatest Hits of 2009 Part VI


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As we continue our journey through some of the news, events, and observations that moved us in 2009, we still have much to learn as we prepare for the new opportunities that await us in 2010.

The Greatest Hits of 2009 Part VI

1. Gary Vaynerchuk and Brian Solis Discuss Putting the Public Back in Public Relations

2. Who Owns Social Media?

3. Size Matters: Job Seekers Measure the Size of Your Social Graph

The Greatest Hits of 2009 Part V


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2009 represented a quantum leap in publishing for me. It was the first time in the years that I’ve been writing and blogging that I challenged myself to publish at a greater frequency, depth, and volume.

Here are some of my favorites…

The Greatest Hits of 2009 Part V

1. Identifying and Connecting with Influencers

2. Full Disclosure: Sponsored Conversations on Twitter Raise Concerns, Prompt Standards

3. I’m Not Talking to You

The Greatest Hits of 2009 Part IV


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Valuable Information flies across our attention dashboards at blinding speeds. As 2009 comes to a close and we embrace a new optimism for 2010, let’s revisit some of the most read and shared posts this year.

Greatest Hits of 2009, Part IV:

1. Social Media is Rife with Experts but Starved of Authorities

2. Unveiling the New Influencers

3. PR Does Not Stand for Press Release: Equalizing Spikes and Valleys

Twitter Economics


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With a $1 billion valuation, Twitter is becoming, according to Co-Founder Evan Williams, an information network, a practically priceless exchange for connections, information, and the resulting activity that ensues.

Indeed, Twitter appears to have evolved into a human seismograph, a lifeline interweaving people through conversations, reciprocity, and connections inspired by the interests, ideas, passions, causes, and observations that move them.

Ning Proves That There’s Life Outside of Facebook and Twitter


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I was recently asked in a 2010 planning meeting about my views on Ning and whether or not it was worthy of consideration or attention. It seems that the question is increasingly raised as Social Media becomes pervasive within the halls of marketing, advertising, customer service, and public relations.

My answer is this. If your only focus is Facebook, blogs, and Twitter, the grapevine to which you’re connected is only telling you part of the story. Listening to keywords in certain networks and not others isolates the true story and the overall opportunity.

The Greatest Hits of 2009 Part III


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What comes around goes around and as we close the chapter on 2009 a new chapter that documents our direction and experiences is already unfolding. Revisiting the stories, lessons, vision that helped get you where you are today may help you surpass not only your expectations, but those of your peers, customers, prospects, and influencers as well.

The Greatest Hits of 2009 Part III

1. Significant

2. Reviving the Traditional Press Release

ABOUT ME

Brian Solis is a digital analyst, anthropologist, and also a futurist. In his work at Altimeter Group, Solis studies the effects of disruptive technology on business and society. He is an avid keynote speaker and award-winning author who is globally recognized as one of the most prominent thought leaders in digital transformation.

His most recent book, What's the Future of Business: Changing the Way Businesses Create Experiences (WTF), explores the landscape of connected consumerism and how business and customer relationships unfold in four distinct moments of truth. His previous book, The End of Business as Usual, explores the emergence of Generation-C, a new generation of customers and employees and how businesses must adapt to reach them. In 2009, Solis released Engage, which is regarded as the industry reference guide for businesses to market, sell and service in the social web.

Contact Brian

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