Putting the Public Back in Public Relations is Now Back in Stock


Credit: Frank Gruber via Flickr

When Deirdre Breakenridge and I initially heard that book stores were reporting that Putting the Public Back in Public Relations was out of stock, we suspected a distribution hiccup was at root of the issue. While it’s never good news to hear that customers cannot get their hands on the very object in which we dedicated and invested over a year of our lives, Deirdre and I were elated to learn that the month-long dry spell was actually due to the book literally selling out around the world.

ESPN takes Social Media Guidelines Just a Bit Too Far or How to Stunt Your Employee’s Growth

Today’s guest Op-ed contributor is Serena Ehrlich, Co-Founder, StartUp Army; Past President, NIRI Los Angeles Chapter, Dallas/Fort Worth Chapter


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Recently ESPN established new social media guidelines banning their employees from discussing anything related to ESPN or sports on any social network. Some see this as a clever move for ESPN to save their intellectual property. I see this decision as detrimental both to ESPN as well as their employees. This sweeping decision has two tragic consequences. Not only does it severely hamper its own staff’s room for professional growth, it marginalizes ESPN’s own opportunities to increase its visibility and reach over the web, possibly hampering its own long term growth.

Using Twitter to Connect PR Students, Educators, and Professionals

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Credit: Shutterstock

I recently participated in #PRStudChat, a recurring discussion between PR experts and those looking to learn on Twitter.

I found it enthralling.

The interactive forum was created by Deirdre Breakenridge, my co-author for Putting the Public Back in Public Relations, and Valerie Simon in response to an ongoing series of questions they received from students seeking advice or insight into how PR was changing in the face of the “now” or real-time Web. In one such interview, PRSSA member and student Angela Hernandez, @AngelaHernandez, posed a simple, but poignant career question, “Is PR Right for Me?”

Fallacious Celebrations of Facebook Fans

Guest Post by Dr. Mark Drapeau – read his blog, follow him on Twitter


Source: Shutterstock Images

Publishing “top 10″ lists is unfortunately a staple of modern journalism.  But alas, writers must drive readers’ eyeballs, even when discussing serious topics like the government.  And so we find a new list that mixes Web 2.0 with the government: “Top 10 agencies with the most Facebook fans.”  For the record, this list is topped by the White House with 327,592 fans, followed by the Marine Corps, Army, CDC, State Department, NASA, NASA JPL, Library of Congress, Air Force, and Environmental Protection Agency.  Congratulations to all these hard-working agencies.

Facebook Tags Now Connect People, Pages and Groups Through Updates


Credit: You can actually buy this lamp.

I’ve long believed that the “@” sign carried with it great power on the Web. In definition, it is the representation of “at” which evolved from the phrase of “at the rate of” in accounting and commercial invoices. Over time its ubiquity was solidified with its use as the buckle linking names to domains in email addresses.

Now Internet culture, specifically Twitter, has evolved and popularized @ conjuring a powerful and poignant symbol of designation, recognition, and action.

Is your PR firm ready for digital marketing? Use these 10 questions to assess their SEO and social media readiness

Guest post by Lee Odden: Follow him on Twitter | Read his blog

6 Questions to Assess Your PR Vendor’s SEO/Social Media Readiness

Recently Jason Falls made an insightful comment on his blog about PR professionals being “social media ready”. In that post, he cited the need for specific social media marketing skills to be assessed for companies evaluating the effectiveness of their PR efforts.

Implement Social Media Guidelines, Now

Guest post by Dan Schawbel: Follow him on Twitter | Read his blog


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Technology has united our professional and personal identities into one.  You are no longer just the financial analyst, doctor, lawyer or “social media guru” during work hours.  People all around you, sitting in cubicles, in offices and even the secretary can find out more personal information about you, with a single search in Google, Facebook, Twitter, etc.  There is no hiding anymore and our identities will fuse even more in the future, as we use social technologies more and more during work.

The Dichotomy Between Social Networks and Education


Einstein Chalkboard: Source

Recently, I discussed the validity of whether or not social networking (the verb) and social networks (as a noun) were impairing our ability to learn. A Stanford study suggested that this might be the case.

It seems that the initial research and its supporting data is now emerging to help us further analyze whether or not this is indeed true or merely hypotheses based on the various samplings of individuals who may or may not serve as relevant subjects.

Proactive Social Media: Filling the Information Space With Great Content

Guest Post by Dr. Mark Drapeau – read his blog, follow him on Twitter


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I recently gave a talk titled Free the People! at the Potomac Forum’s Government 2.0 Leadership, Collaboration, and Public Engagement Symposium in Washington, DC that generated enough interest for me to post my slide deck and write a summary for a wider audience. These thoughts constitute some of my early ideas about “offensive social media” for organizations (this talk was particularly geared towards a government audience, but the fundamentals apply to the private and public sectors more broadly).

The Gift of Compassion and Inspiration


Source: ILP

Sometimes we are quick to judge with or without due cause. Even if we believe our views to be right, many times our perception is merely right within our world and not necessarily the worlds of others. Perhaps we’re caught up in the real-time aspects of having access to information and the power to publish on-demand.  Maybe we need to seek justification for our unwillingness to step outside of our comfort zones. Or perchance, we’re simply repressing animosity  towards those who seem to envision and/or accomplish things we haven’t yet found the energy, passion or cause to pursue ourselves.

ABOUT ME

Brian Solis is a digital analyst, anthropologist, and also a futurist. In his work at Altimeter Group, Solis studies the effects of disruptive technology on business and society. He is an avid keynote speaker and award-winning author who is globally recognized as one of the most prominent thought leaders in digital transformation.

His most recent book, What's the Future of Business: Changing the Way Businesses Create Experiences (WTF), explores the landscape of connected consumerism and how business and customer relationships unfold in four distinct moments of truth. His previous book, The End of Business as Usual, explores the emergence of Generation-C, a new generation of customers and employees and how businesses must adapt to reach them. In 2009, Solis released Engage, which is regarded as the industry reference guide for businesses to market, sell and service in the social web.

Contact Brian

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