Posts Tagged ‘pr’

The Greatest Hits of 2009 Part VIII


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Happy New Year!

Welcome to 2010…this is your year. Let’s build upon the lessons we learned in 2009 in order to help us continue on our journey towards earned relevance.

The Greatest Hits of 2009 Part VIII

1. The Second Life of Second Life

2. The Science of Retweets on Twitter

3. Teens Adopting Twitter

4. Social Media Accounts for 18% of Information Search Market

5. The Future of the Social Web

The Greatest Hits of 2009 Part VII


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As 2009 comes to a close, we’re inspired to take what we learned this year and apply it to the uncharted year that lies ahead. Our resolutions for 2010 must include learning and participation. With an open mind and an open heart, we can continue to learn, grow, and in turn, teach those around us to make 2010 a banner year for new media literacy and change.

The Greatest Hits of 2009 Part VII

The Greatest Hits of 2009 Part V


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2009 represented a quantum leap in publishing for me. It was the first time in the years that I’ve been writing and blogging that I challenged myself to publish at a greater frequency, depth, and volume.

Here are some of my favorites…

The Greatest Hits of 2009 Part V

1. Identifying and Connecting with Influencers

2. Full Disclosure: Sponsored Conversations on Twitter Raise Concerns, Prompt Standards

3. I’m Not Talking to You

The Greatest Hits of 2009 Part IV


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Valuable Information flies across our attention dashboards at blinding speeds. As 2009 comes to a close and we embrace a new optimism for 2010, let’s revisit some of the most read and shared posts this year.

Greatest Hits of 2009, Part IV:

1. Social Media is Rife with Experts but Starved of Authorities

2. Unveiling the New Influencers

3. PR Does Not Stand for Press Release: Equalizing Spikes and Valleys

Some Things are Worth Repeating: The Greatest Hits of 2009 Part I


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In the world of reruns, there’s a saying, if you’ve never seen it, then it’s new to you.

As we near the end of 2009, I wanted to share with you some of the posts that I believe will help you as you tackle challenges, opportunities, and set the stage for innovation and growth in 2010.

On PR, Social Media and the Evolution of the Web with Robert Scoble

I recently visited good friend Robert Scoble, his lovely wife Maryam and their family in Half Moon Bay. It was an overdue trip, one without an agenda. It was a fleeting opportunity to catch up, talk a bit about the latest book, and also an excuse to have a fireside chat, literally, on the grounds of the Ritz Carlton (overlooking the 18th green and the Pacific Ocean.)

Finding Influencers in Social Media


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Guest post by Dan Zarella, author of “The Social Media Marketing Book,” published by O’Reilly.

When you’re trying to find targets for a social media marketing campaign, you should be looking for two types of people, influencers and audience. Your audience is the people you’re trying to sell to, this is a wide swath of potential users, clients or customers. They may or may not be heavily involved in social media and they may or may not have large followings. Your influencers are the people your audience listens to. They are actively engaged in the social web and can communicate with lots of people. They are the vector for your contagious messages to spread through, to reach your audience you should seed your campaigns to your influencers.

The Future of the Embargo

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In media and blogger relations, PR typically wields two powerful tools to help boost the effectiveness of pitching and potential placement of news: the embargo and the exclusive.

FTC Values Sponsored Posts at $11,000 Apiece

What follows is the unabridged version of my latest post for TechCrunch, “FTC Values Sponsored Conversations at $11,000 Apiece

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In May, I reviewed the proposed Federal Trade Commission guidelines that would ultimately affect and change how brands employ endorsements into their marketing, advertising, and communications programs.

Today, the Federal Trade Commission made good on its threat promise by releasing its final revisions to the guidance it gives advertisers on how to keep their endorsement and testimonial ads in line with the FTC Act. This amendment marks 29 years since The Guides were last updated in 1980.

Putting the Public Back in Public Relations is Now Back in Stock


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When Deirdre Breakenridge and I initially heard that book stores were reporting that Putting the Public Back in Public Relations was out of stock, we suspected a distribution hiccup was at root of the issue. While it’s never good news to hear that customers cannot get their hands on the very object in which we dedicated and invested over a year of our lives, Deirdre and I were elated to learn that the month-long dry spell was actually due to the book literally selling out around the world.

ABOUT ME

Brian Solis is a digital analyst, anthropologist, and also a futurist. In his work at Altimeter Group, Solis studies the effects of disruptive technology on business and society. He is an avid keynote speaker and award-winning author who is globally recognized as one of the most prominent thought leaders in digital transformation.

His most recent book, What's the Future of Business: Changing the Way Businesses Create Experiences (WTF), explores the landscape of connected consumerism and how business and customer relationships unfold in four distinct moments of truth. His previous book, The End of Business as Usual, explores the emergence of Generation-C, a new generation of customers and employees and how businesses must adapt to reach them. In 2009, Solis released Engage, which is regarded as the industry reference guide for businesses to market, sell and service in the social web.

Contact Brian

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