Posts Tagged ‘twitter’

The Psychology of Twitter with Dr. Drew

Twitter is a phenomenon unto itself. Which is why, in the study of Social Media, Digital Anthropology and Sociology prevails.

Technology indeed facilitates interaction while also introducing us to nuances that transcend the parameters governing natural conversations and asynchronous dialogue into new forms of conversational threads and networks.

Twitter is among those networks actively studied by many (myself included) as it seemingly defies the laws of natural flow and engagement.  The foundation that makes Twitter work is also the very essence that should prevent it from working at all.

These are a Few of My Favorite Tweets


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I believe that part of the allure of the social web is the ability to not only publish content, but to also recognize the contributions of others. Twitter is one such forum where the public art of recognition and reciprocity is spoken through both actions and words and are usually done so through @’s, Retweets (RTs), Follow Fridays (FF), link sharing, et al.

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FTC Values Sponsored Posts at $11,000 Apiece

What follows is the unabridged version of my latest post for TechCrunch, “FTC Values Sponsored Conversations at $11,000 Apiece

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In May, I reviewed the proposed Federal Trade Commission guidelines that would ultimately affect and change how brands employ endorsements into their marketing, advertising, and communications programs.

Today, the Federal Trade Commission made good on its threat promise by releasing its final revisions to the guidance it gives advertisers on how to keep their endorsement and testimonial ads in line with the FTC Act. This amendment marks 29 years since The Guides were last updated in 1980.

Twitter Trends: Airline Hotlist August 2009

As Twitter adoption travels from the left to the right of Rogers’ Diffusion of Innovations Bell Curve, mainstream consumer behavior gathers momentum, manifesting into influential and telling market indicators. This invaluable behavior and sentiment eventually becomes deafening and without actively monitoring and analyzing this movement, we miss opportunities to learn, grow, and help.

We need a prescribed lens into the real-time thoughts, observations, and experiences of real people, unfiltered, to make informed decisions and both lead and evolve along with our markets.

At Your Service: Twitter Data and Sentiment Analysis


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For the last year, I’ve served as a strategic advisor to PeopleBrowsr. While many of you may know PeopleBrowsr as a Web-based client for Twitter and other social networks, the real story is that over the past several months, we’ve quietly built a comprehensive foundation and supporting infrastructure for capturing, organizing, and analyzing data, sentiment, and corresponding activity to reveal the indicators, hotspots, opportunities and trends that define the Twitterverse and ultimately, business. As such, I’ve spent a great deal of time researching activity as it relates to many of the industries that I serve in order to help brands cultivate meaningful relationships while also evolving business services and practices based on actual intelligence.

Revealing the People Defining Social Networks


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Social Networks are among the most powerful examples of socialized media. They create a dynamic ecosystem that incubates and nurtures relationships between people and the content they create and share.

As these communities permeate and reshape our lifestyle and how we communicate with one another, we’re involuntarily forcing advertisers and marketers to rapidly evolve how they vie for our attention.

Group Mentality: Twitter to Debut Lists

Long available using third-party Twitter tools such as PeopleBrowsr or TweetDeck, Twitter is readying the release of lists, or otherwise known in other networks (FriendFeed) as groups.

This is welcome, albeit overdue, feature that allows users to categorize and organize information based on themes, interests, action items, locales, and friends/peers for future reference, followup and sharing.

The Twitter blog goes into greater detail (note the fact that lists are public by default):

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What if Twitter Had an App Store? Now It Does.

In October 2008, I documented months of research and analysis into a full directory of Twitter applications for communications and marketing professionals. In May 2009, I categorized the most applicable and qualified applications, and with the help of JESS3, we published The Twitterverse, a beta map of the Twitter universe that arranged relevant applications in a way that allowed us to see and navigate the landscape more efficiently and effectively.

One in Five Tweets are Related to Products

According to a recent study, 20 percent of tweets published are actually invitations for product information, answers or responses from peers or directly by brand representatives.

Jim Jansen, associate professor of information science and technology at the College of Information Sciences and Technology (IST) at Penn State, along with IST doctoral student Mimi Zhang, undergraduate student Kate Sobel and Twitter chief scientist Abdur Chowdhury, investigated micro interaction as an electronic word-of-mouth medium, using Twitter as the platform. The results were published in the Journal of the American Society for Information Sciences and Technology.

The Wisdom of the Crowds?


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More often than not, we’re reminded through simple human behavior and interaction that Twitter isn’t always the TNN (Twitter News Network) we expect it to be. And, when the collective of people “being themselves” amasses concentration and velocity, we learn that sometimes the wisdom that manifests within the crowds isn’t very wise at all.

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ABOUT ME

Brian Solis is a digital analyst, anthropologist, and also a futurist. In his work at Altimeter Group, Solis studies the effects of disruptive technology on business and society. He is an avid keynote speaker and award-winning author who is globally recognized as one of the most prominent thought leaders in digital transformation.

His most recent book, What's the Future of Business: Changing the Way Businesses Create Experiences (WTF), explores the landscape of connected consumerism and how business and customer relationships unfold in four distinct moments of truth. His previous book, The End of Business as Usual, explores the emergence of Generation-C, a new generation of customers and employees and how businesses must adapt to reach them. In 2009, Solis released Engage, which is regarded as the industry reference guide for businesses to market, sell and service in the social web.

Contact Brian

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